Little Tales of Misogyny by Patricia Highsmith - PDF free download eBook

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Overview

Long out of print, this Highsmith classic resurfaces with a vengeance.The great revival of interest in Patricia Highsmith continues with the publication of this legendary, cultish short story collection. With an eerie simplicity of style, Highsmith t...

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Details of Little Tales of Misogyny

ISBN
9780393323375
Publisher
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date
Age range
18+ Years
Book language
GB
Pages
128
Format
PDF, CHM, DOC, FB3
Quality
Extra high quality OCR
Dimensions
5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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Some brief overview of this book

Long out of print, this Highsmith classic resurfaces with a vengeance.

The great revival of interest in Patricia Highsmith continues with the publication of this legendary, cultish short story collection. With an eerie simplicity of style, Highsmith turns our next-door neighbors into sadistic psychopaths, lying in wait among white picket fences and manicured lawns. In the darkly satiric, often mordantly hilarious sketches that make up Little Tales of Misogyny, Highsmith upsets our conventional notions of female character, revealing the devastating power of these once familiar creatures—The Dancer, The Female Novelist, The Prude—who destroy both themselves and the men around them. This work attesets to Highsmiths reputation as the poet of apprehension (Graham Greene).

A few words about book's author

Patricia Highsmith (1921-1995) was the author of more than twenty novels, including Strangers on a Train, The Price of Salt and The Talented Mr. Ripley, as well as numerous short stories.

Biography

Suspense novels are often described as chilling, but no one turns down the readers emotional thermostat quite like Patricia Highsmith, author of such haunting psychological thrillers as Strangers on a Train and creator of the sociopathic series protagonist Tom Ripley. During her life, Highsmith was a popular author in Europe, where she lived; in her native United States, however, her books went sporadically in and out of print for decades. Now, the writer whom Graham Greene called the poet of apprehension has finally gained recognition in the States — not only as a master of the suspense genre, but as a literary author of rare talent. Highsmith grew up in Texas and New York, but spent most of her adult life in England, France and Switzerland. By most accounts she was a loner who avoided other people, including other writers; but she did have early help in her career from Truman Capote, who got her a stint at the Yaddo writers colony in New York. Her first novel, Strangers on a Train, tells the story of an architect and a psychopath who meet on a train and swap murders. The book gained Highsmith considerable fame, especially after it was made into a film by Alfred Hitchcock. A second novel, The Price of Salt, was printed under a pseudonym after her first publishers turned it down. Though her subsequent works didnt sell well in her home country, she kept turning out the kinds of novels and short stories the New Yorker called bad dreams that keep us thrashing for the rest of the night. Several movies have been loosely based on Highsmiths books, including Danny DeVitos Hitchcock spoof Throw Momma From the Train; Wim Wenders The American Friend, adapted from Ripleys Game; and Purple Noon, a French film based on The Talented Mr. Ripley. But it was Academy Award-winning director Anthony Minghellas lush screen adaptation of The Talented Mr. Ripley, released four years after Highsmiths death and 44 years after the books publication, that introduced Highsmith to a wider audience and led to a rediscovery of her works. Subtle enough for a seminar yet entertaining enough for the beach, Highsmiths coolly narrated tales of terror display an observant eye for social behavior as well as individual psychology. Most books in the suspense genre provide a hero whose fundamental honesty and decency stand as bulwarks against the evil he or she confronts. But in a Highsmith novel, the reader is alone with victim and victimizer — and an unsettling sense of empathy with both. As Francis Wyndham has noted, Highsmiths peculiar brand of horror comes less from the inevitability of disaster, than from the ease with which it might have been avoided. The evil of her agents is answered by the impotence of her patients — this is not the attraction of opposites, but in some subtle way the call of like to like. When they finally clash in the climactic catastrophe, the readers sense of satisfaction may derive from sources as dark as those which motivate Patricia Highsmiths destroyers and their fascinated victims.

Good To Know

Patricia Highsmith was born Mary Patricia Plangman; her parents divorced soon after she was born, however, and she was given her stepfathers last name. After Highsmith graduated from college, she lived for a time with her mother and stepfather in Greenwich Village, where she wrote comic books to support herself, including scripts for the Superman series. A lesbian herself, Highsmith is thought to have written the first American novel in which a homosexual love story has a happy ending. The novel, The Price of Salt, was published under the pseudonym Claire Morgan; it was reissued in 1984 (as Carol), but didnt appear under the writers real name until 1991. Highsmith once told an interviewer that the only suspense writer she read was the master — Dostoevsky, over and over. In her book Plotting and Writing Suspense Fiction, she wrote, I think most of Dostoyevskys books would be called suspense books, were they being published today for the first time. But he would be asked to cut, because of production costs. The premise of The Talented Mr. Ripley was inspired by Henry Jamess The Ambassadors, in which a widow sends her fiance from America to Paris to fetch her wayward son.

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