Beezus and Ramona by Beverly Cleary - PDF free download eBook

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  • Published: Sep 03, 2015
  • Reviews: 44

Brief introduction:

Beezus Quimbys four-year-old sister, Ramona, is exasperating. Ramona always manages to get her way. Poor Beezus, she must be the only ten-year-old in the world with such a pest for a sister. How can she learn to love and accept this four-year-old...

more details below

Details of Beezus and Ramona

ISBN
9780807272800
Publisher
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date
Age range
8 - 10 Years
Book language
ENG
Format
PDF, CHM, DJVU, DOC
Quality
Extra high quality OCR
Dimensions
5.48 (w) x 7.34 (h) x 1.18 (d)
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Some brief overview of this book

Beezus Quimbys four-year-old sister, Ramona, is exasperating. Ramona always manages to get her way. Poor Beezus, she must be the only ten-year-old in the world with such a pest for a sister. How can she learn to love and accept this four-year-old terror?

Beezus biggest problem was her 4-year-old sister Ramona. Even though Beezus knew sisters were supposed to love each other, with a sister like Ramona, it seemed impossible.

nspired to write the books shed longed to read but couldnt find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born!

Mrs. Clearys books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Associations Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to childrens literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.

Jaqueline Rogers has been a professional childrens book illustrator for more than twenty years and has worked on nearly one hundred childrens books.

Biography

Beverly Cleary was inadvertently doing market research for her books before she wrote them, as a young children’s librarian in Yakima, Washington. Cleary heard a lot about what kids were and weren’t responding to in literature, and she thought of her library patrons when she later sat down to write her first book. Henry Huggins, published in 1950, was an effort to represent kids like the ones in Yakima and like the ones in her childhood neighborhood in Oregon. The bunch from Klickitat Street live in modest houses in a quiet neighborhood, but they’re busy: busy with rambunctious dogs (one Ribsy, to be precise), paper routes, robot building, school, bicycle acquisitions, and other projects. Cleary was particularly sensitive to the boys from her library days who complained that they could find nothing of interest to read – and Ralph and the Motorcycle was inspired by her son, who in fourth grade said he wanted to read about motorcycles. Fifteen years after her Henry books, Cleary would concoct the delightful story of a boy who teaches Ralph to ride his red toy motorcycle. Cleary’s best known character, however, is a girl: Ramona Quimby, the sometimes difficult but always entertaining little sister whom Cleary follows from kindergarten to fourth grade in a series of books. Ramona is a Henry Huggins neighbor who, with her sister, got her first proper introduction in Beezus and Ramona, adding a dimension of sibling dynamics to the adventures on Klickitat Street. Cleary’s stories, so simple and so true, deftly portrayed the exasperation and exuberance of being a kid. Finally, an author seemed to understand perfectly about bossy/pesty siblings, unfair teachers, playmate politics, the joys of clubhouses and the perils of sub-mattress monsters. Cleary is one of the rare children’s authors who has been able to engage both boys and girls on their own terms, mostly through either Henry Huggins or Ramona and Beezus. She has not limited herself to those characters, though. In 1983, she won the Newbery Medal with Dear Mr. Henshaw, the story of a boy coping with his parents’ divorce, as told through his journal entries and correspondence with his favorite author. She has also written a few books for older girls (Fifteen, The Luckiest Girl, Sister of the Bride, and Jean and Johnny) mostly focusing on first love and family relationships. A set of books for beginning readers stars four-year-old twins Jimmy and Janet. Some of Cleary’s books – particularly her titles for young adults – may seem somewhat alien to kids whose daily lives don’t feature soda fountains, bottles of ink, or even learning cursive. Still, the author’s stories and characters stand the test of time; and she nails the basic concerns of childhood and adolescence. Her books (particularly the more modern Ramona series, which touches on the repercussions of a father’s job loss and a mother’s return to work) remain relevant classics. Cleary has said in an essay that she wrote her two autobiographical books, A Girl from Yamhill and My Own Two Feet, because I wanted to tell young readers what life was like in safer, simpler, less-prosperous times, so different from today. She has conveyed that safer, simpler era — still fraught with its own timeless concerns — to children in her fiction as well, more than half a century after her first books were released.

Good To Know

Word processing is not Clearys style. She writes, I write in longhand on yellow legal pads. Some pages turn out right the first time (hooray!), some pages I revise once or twice and some I revise half-a-dozen times. I then attack my enemy the typewriter and produce a badly typed manuscript which I take to a typist whose fingers somehow hit the right keys. No, I do not use a computer. Everybody asks. Cleary usually starts her books on January 2. Up until she was six, Cleary lived in Yamhill, Oregon — a town so small it had no library. Clearys mother took up the job of librarian, asking for books to be sent from the state branch and lending them out from a lodge room over a bank. It was, Clearly remembers, a dingy room filled with shabby leather-covered chairs and smelling of stale cigar smoke. The books were shelved in a donated china cabinet. It was there I made the most magical discovery: There were books written especially for children! Cleary authored a series of tie-in books in the early 1960s for classic TV show Leave It to Beaver. Clearys books appear in over 20 countries in 14 languages. Clearys book The Luckiest Girl is based in part on her own young adulthood, when a cousin of her mothers offered to take Beverly for the summer and have her attend Chaffey Junior College in Ontario, California. Cleary went from there to the University of California at Berkeley. The actress Sarah Polley got her start playing Ramona in the late ‘80s TV series. Says Cleary in a Q & A on her web site:_25E2_2580_259CI won_25E2_2580_2599t let go of the rights for television productions unless I have s08617A64B1

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A few words about book author

Beverly Cleary is one of Americas most beloved authors. As a child, she struggled with reading and writing. But by third grade, after spending much time in her public library in Portland, Oregon, she found her skills had greatly improved. Before long, her school librarian was saying that she should write childrens books when she grew up.

Instead she became a librarian. When a young boy asked her, Where are the books about kids like us? she remembered her teachers encouragement and was inspired to write the books shed longed to read but couldnt find when she was younger. She based her funny stories on her own neighborhood experiences and the sort of children she knew. And so, the Klickitat Street gang was born!

Mrs. Clearys books have earned her many prestigious awards, including the American Library Associations Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, presented to her in recognition of her lasting contribution to childrens literature. Dear Mr. Henshaw won the Newbery Medal, and Ramona Quimby, Age 8 and Ramona and Her Father have been named Newbery Honor Books. Her characters, including Beezus and Ramona Quimby, Henry Huggins, and Ralph, the motorcycle-riding mouse, have delighted children for generations.

Jaqueline Rogers has been a professional childrens book illustrator for more than twenty years and has worked on nearly one hundred childrens books.

Biography

Beverly Cleary was inadvertently doing market research for her books before she wrote them, as a young children’s librarian in Yakima, Washington. Cleary heard a lot about what kids were and weren’t responding to in literature, and she thought of her library patrons when she later sat down to write her first book. Henry Huggins, published in 1950, was an effort to represent kids like the ones in Yakima and like the ones in her childhood neighborhood in Oregon. The bunch from Klickitat Street live in modest houses in a quiet neighborhood, but they’re busy: busy with rambunctious dogs (one Ribsy, to be precise), paper routes, robot building, school, bicycle acquisitions, and other projects. Cleary was particularly sensitive to the boys from her library days who complained that they could find nothing of interest to read – and Ralph and the Motorcycle was inspired by her son, who in fourth grade said he wanted to read about motorcycles. Fifteen years after her Henry books, Cleary would concoct the delightful story of a boy who teaches Ralph to ride his red toy motorcycle. Cleary’s best known character, however, is a girl: Ramona Quimby, the sometimes difficult but always entertaining little sister whom Cleary follows from kindergarten to fourth grade in a series of books. Ramona is a Henry Huggins neighbor who, with her sister, got her first proper introduction in Beezus and Ramona, adding a dimension of sibling dynamics to the adventures on Klickitat Street. Cleary’s stories, so simple and so true, deftly portrayed the exasperation and exuberance of being a kid. Finally, an author seemed to understand perfectly about bossy/pesty siblings, unfair teachers, playmate politics, the joys of clubhouses and the perils of sub-mattress monsters. Cleary is one of the rare children’s authors who has been able to engage both boys and girls on their own terms, mostly through either Henry Huggins or Ramona and Beezus. She has not limited herself to those characters, though. In 1983, she won the Newbery Medal with Dear Mr. Henshaw, the story of a boy coping with his parents’ divorce, as told through his journal entries and correspondence with his favorite author. She has also written a few books for older girls (Fifteen, The Luckiest Girl, Sister of the Bride, and Jean and Johnny) mostly focusing on first love and family relationships. A set of books for beginning readers stars four-year-old twins Jimmy and Janet. Some of Cleary’s books – particularly her titles for young adults – may seem somewhat alien to kids whose daily lives don’t feature soda fountains, bottles of ink, or even learning cursive. Still, the author’s stories and characters stand the test of time; and she nails the basic concerns of childhood and adolescence. Her books (particularly the more modern Ramona series, which touches on the repercussions of a father’s job loss and a mother’s return to work) remain relevant classics. Cleary has said in an essay that she wrote her two autobiographical books, A Girl from Yamhill and My Own Two Feet, because I wanted to tell young readers what life was like in safer, simpler, less-prosperous times, so different from today. She has conveyed that safer, simpler era — still fraught with its own timeless concerns — to children in her fiction as well, more than half a century after her first books were released.

Good To Know

Word processing is not Clearys style. She writes, I write in longhand on yellow legal pads. Some pages turn out right the first time (hooray!), some pages I revise once or twice and some I revise half-a-dozen times. I then attack my enemy the typewriter and produce a badly typed manuscript which I take to a typist whose fingers somehow hit the right keys. No, I do not use a computer. Everybody asks. Cleary usually starts her books on January 2. Up until she was six, Cleary lived in Yamhill, Oregon — a town so small it had no library. Clearys mother took up the job of librarian, asking for books to be sent from the state branch and lending them out from a lodge room over a bank. It was, Clearly remembers, a dingy room filled with shabby leather-covered chairs and smelling of stale cigar smoke. The books were shelved in a donated china cabinet. It was there I made the most magical discovery: There were books written especially for children! Cleary authored a series of tie-in books in the early 1960s for classic TV show Leave It to Beaver. Clearys books appear in over 20 countries in 14 languages. Clearys book The Luckiest Girl is based in part on her own young adulthood, when a cousin of her mothers offered to take Beverly for the summer and have her attend Chaffey Junior College in Ontario, California. Cleary went from there to the University of California at Berkeley. The actress Sarah Polley got her start playing Ramona in the late ‘80s TV series. Says Cleary in a Q & A on her web site:_25E2_2580_259CI won_25E2_2580_2599t let go of the rights for television productions unless I have s08617A64B1

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