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Details of Encounters with the Archdruid

Encounters with the Archdruid
Exact title of book
Encounters with the Archdruid
Book author
John McPhee
ISBN
9780374148225
Publisher
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Published
Aug 28, 1971
Language
English
Format
PDF, FB2, EPUB, MOBI
Pages
256
File size (in PDF)
2304 kB

Some brief overview of book

The narratives in this book are of journeys made in three wildernesses - on a coastal island, in a Western mountain range, and on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. The four men portrayed here have different relationships to their environment, and they encounter each other on mountain trails, in forests and rapids, sometimes with reserve, sometimes with friendliness, sometimes fighting hard across a philosophical divide. , The Founding Fish (2002), Uncommon Carriers (2007), and Silk Parachute (2011).

Encounters with the Archdruid (1972) and The Curve of Binding Energy (1974) were nominated for National Book Awards in the category of science. McPhee received the Award in Literature from the Academy of Arts and Letters in 1977. In 1999, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Annals of the Former World.

He lives in Princeton, New Jersey. Biography John McPhee ought to be a bore, The Christian Science Monitor once observed. With a bores persistence he seizes a subject, shakes loose a cloud of more detail than we ever imagined we would care to hear on any subject yet somehow he makes the whole procedure curiously fascinating.

This is his specialty. A New Yorker writer hired in 1965 by another devil-is-in-the-details disciple, William Shawn, McPhee has taken full advantage of the magazines commitment to long, unusual pieces and became one of the practitioners of so-called literary journalism, joining a fraternity occupied by Tom Wolfe, Tracey Kidder, and Joan Didion. He hung on during the Tina Brown days, when the marching orders were for short and topical pieces.

And the magazines current editor, David Remnick, was once a student of McPhees annual writing seminar at Princeton University. The temptation is to brand McPhee a nature writer, since he spends so much of his professional life trekking through the outdoors or scribbling notes in the passenger seat of a game wardens pickup truck. But his writing isnt so easily labeled as that.

Instead, he has the luxury of writing about whatever strikes his fancy, oftentimes plumbing childhood passions. In fact, his big break as a professional writer combined two of his favorite things sports and Princeton, his home since birth. In 1965, he finally got published by The New Yorker with a profile on Princeton basketball star Bill Bradley.

The piece later became his first book. He wrote for the television program Robert Montgomery Presents in the late 1950s and was on staff at Time in the 50s and 60s, frequently pitching pieces to his dream publication,The New Yorker. That particular success eluded him until Shawn picked up the Bradley piece and then spent hours with him editing the piece the night the magazine was going to press.

In a 1997 interview with Newsday, McPhee recalled that experience I said to him, This whole enterprise is going on and youre sitting here talking to me about this comma. How do you do it? And he said, It takes as long as it takes.

Thats the greatest answer I ever heard. The same might be said of McPhee himself. He has written what, for many, is the definitive book on Alaska, Coming into the Country.

With this book,The New York Times said, McPhee proves to be the most versatile journalist in America. He spent 696 pages on the geological development of North America in Annals of the Former World. He explored mans battle to tame mudslides and lava flows in The Control of Nature.

He considered the birch-bark canoe in The Survival of the Bark Canoe. He caused a bit of head-scratching over the topic of his 17th book, La Place de la Concorde Suisse the Swiss army. The itinerary, at first blush, might not always be compelling, but in McPhees hands, the journey is its own reward.

Mr. McPhee is a writers writer a master craftsman whom many aspirants study, The Wall Street Journal said in 1989. For one thing, he has an engaging, distinctive voice. It is warm, understated and wry.

Within a paragraph or two, he takes us into his company and makes us feel were on an outing with an old chum. A talky old chum, to be sure, with an occasional tendency to corniness and rambling, but a cherished one nevertheless. We read his books not so much because were thirsty for information about canoes, but because its worth tagging along on any literary journey Mr. McPhee feels like taking.

Good To Know The son of a doctor, McPhee credits his love of the outdoors to the 13 summers he spent at Camp Keewaydin, where his father was the camp physician. His devotion to the perfect sentence came from a high school English teacher who assigned her students three compositions a week, an assignment that included an outline defending the compositions structure. Bill Bradley made McPhee his daughters godfather.

About book author

McPhee was born in Princeton, New Jersey, and was educated at Princeton University and Cambridge University. His writing career began at Time magazine and led to his long association with The New Yorker, where he has been a staff writer since 1965. Also in 1965, he published his first book, A Sense of Where You Are, with Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and in the years since, he has written nearly 30 books, including Oranges (1967), Coming into the Country (1977), The Control of Nature (1989), The Founding Fish (2002), Uncommon Carriers (2007), and Silk Parachute (2011).

Encounters with the Archdruid (1972) and The Curve of Binding Energy (1974) were nominated for National Book Awards in the category of science. McPhee received the Award in Literature from the Academy of Arts and Letters in 1977. In 1999, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Annals of the Former World.

He lives in Princeton, New Jersey. Biography John McPhee ought to be a bore, The Christian Science Monitor once observed. With a bores persistence he seizes a subject, shakes loose a cloud of more detail than we ever imagined we would care to hear on any subject yet somehow he makes the whole procedure curiously fascinating.

This is his specialty. A New Yorker writer hired in 1965 by another devil-is-in-the-details disciple, William Shawn, McPhee has taken full advantage of the magazines commitment to long, unusual pieces and became one of the practitioners of so-called literary journalism, joining a fraternity occupied by Tom Wolfe, Tracey Kidder, and Joan Didion. He hung on during the Tina Brown days, when the marching orders were for short and topical pieces.

And the magazines current editor, David Remnick, was once a student of McPhees annual writing seminar at Princeton University. The temptation is to brand McPhee a nature writer, since he spends so much of his professional life trekking through the outdoors or scribbling notes in the passenger seat of a game wardens pickup truck. But his writing isnt so easily labeled as that.

Instead, he has the luxury of writing about whatever strikes his fancy, oftentimes plumbing childhood passions. In fact, his big break as a professional writer combined two of his favorite things sports and Princeton, his home since birth. In 1965, he finally got published by The New Yorker with a profile on Princeton basketball star Bill Bradley.

The piece later became his first book. He wrote for the television program Robert Montgomery Presents in the late 1950s and was on staff at Time in the 50s and 60s, frequently pitching pieces to his dream publication,The New Yorker. That particular success eluded him until Shawn picked up the Bradley piece and then spent hours with him editing the piece the night the magazine was going to press.

In a 1997 interview with Newsday, McPhee recalled that experience I said to him, This whole enterprise is going on and youre sitting here talking to me about this comma. How do you do it? And he said, It takes as long as it takes.

Thats the greatest answer I ever heard. The same might be said of McPhee himself. He has written what, for many, is the definitive book on Alaska, Coming into the Country.

With this book,The New York Times said, McPhee proves to be the most versatile journalist in America. He spent 696 pages on the geological development of North America in Annals of the Former World. He explored mans battle to tame mudslides and lava flows in The Control of Nature.

He considered the birch-bark canoe in The Survival of the Bark Canoe. He caused a bit of head-scratching over the topic of his 17th book, La Place de la Concorde Suisse the Swiss army. The itinerary, at first blush, might not always be compelling, but in McPhees hands, the journey is its own reward.

Mr. McPhee is a writers writer a master craftsman whom many aspirants study, The Wall Street Journal said in 1989. For one thing, he has an engaging, distinctive voice. It is warm, understated and wry.

Within a paragraph or two, he takes us into his company and makes us feel were on an outing with an old chum. A talky old chum, to be sure, with an occasional tendency to corniness and rambling, but a cherished one nevertheless. We read his books not so much because were thirsty for information about canoes, but because its worth tagging along on any literary journey Mr. McPhee feels like taking.

Good To Know The son of a doctor, McPhee credits his love of the outdoors to the 13 summers he spent at Camp Keewaydin, where his father was the camp physician. His devotion to the perfect sentence came from a high school English teacher who assigned her students three compositions a week, an assignment that included an outline defending the compositions structure. Bill Bradley made McPhee his daughters godfather.

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