One Generation After by Elie Wiesel - PDF free download eBook

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  • Published: Oct 12, 2015
  • Reviews: 31

Brief introduction:

Twenty years after he and his family were deported from Sighet to Auschwitz, Elie Wiesel returned to his town in search of the watch—a bar mitzvah gift—he had buried in his backyard before they left.From the Trade Paperback edition. shall I forget...

more details below

Details of One Generation After

ISBN
9780805242966
Publisher
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date
Age range
18+ Years
Book language
ENG
Pages
208
Format
PDF, DOC, EPUB, TXT
Quality
Normal quality scanned pages
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Some brief overview of this book

Twenty years after he and his family were deported from Sighet to Auschwitz, Elie Wiesel returned to his town in search of the watch—a bar mitzvah gift—he had buried in his backyard before they left.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed. Never shall I forget that smoke. Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky. Since the publication of this passage in Night, Elie Wiesel has devoted his life to ensuring that the world never forgets the horrors of the Holocaust, and to fostering the hope that they never happen again. Wiesel was 15 years old when the Nazis invaded his hometown of Sighet, Romania. He and his family were taken to Auschwitz, where his mother and the youngest of his three sisters died. He and his father were later transported to Buchenwald, where his father died shortly before Allied forces liberated the camp in 1945. After the war, Wiesel attended the Sorbonne in Paris and worked for a while as a journalist. He met the Nobel Prize-winning writer Francois Mauriac, who helped persuade Wiesel to break his private vow never to speak of his experiences in the death camps. During a long recuperation from a car accident in New York City in 1956, Wiesel decided to make his home in the United States. His memoir Night, which appeared two years later (compressed from an earlier, longer work, And the World Remained Silent), was initially met with skepticism. The Holocaust was not something people wanted to know about in those days, Wiesel later said in a Time magazine interview. But eventually the book drew recognition and readers. A slim volume of terrifying power (The New York Times), Night remains one of the most widely read works on the Holocaust. It was followed by over 40 more books, including novels, essay collections and plays. Wiesels writings often explore the paradoxes raised by his memories: he finds it impossible to speak about the Holocaust, yet impossible to remain silent; impossible to believe in God, yet impossible not to believe. Wiesel has also worked to bring attention to the plight of oppressed people around the world. When human lives are endangered, when human dignity is in jeopardy, national borders and sensitivities become irrelevant, he said in his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. Wherever men and women are persecuted because of their race, religion, or political views, that place must — at that moment — become the center of the universe. Though lauded by many as a crusader for justice, Wiesel has also been criticized for his part in what some see as the commercialization of the Holocaust. In his 2000 memoir And the Sea Is Never Full, Wiesel shares some of his own qualms about fame and politics, but reiterates what he sees as his duty as a survivor and witness: The one among us who would survive would testify for all of us. He would speak and demand justice on our behalf; as our spokesman he would make certain that our memory would penetrate that of humanity. He would do nothing else.

Good To Know

Use of the term Holocaust to describe the extermination of six million Jews and millions of other civilians by the Nazis is widely thought to have originated in Night. Two of Wiesels subsequent works , Dawn and The Accident, form a kind of trilogy with Night. These stories live deeply in all that I have written and all that I am ever going to write, the author has said. President Jimmy Carter appointed Wiesel to be chairman of the Presidents Commission on the Holocaust in 1978. In 1980, Wiesel became founding chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. He is also the founding president of the Paris-based Universal Academy of Cultures and cofounder of the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity. Since 1969, Marion Wiesel has translated her husband Elies books from French into English. They live in New York City and have one son.

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A few words about book author

Elie Wiesel is the author of more than fifty books, including his unforgettable international best sellers Night and A Beggar in Jerusalem, winner of the Prix Médicis. He has been awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States Congressional Gold Medal, and the French Legion of Honor with the rank of Grand Cross. In 1986, he received the Nobel Peace Prize. He is Andrew W. Mellon Professor in the Humanities and University Professor at Boston University.

Biography

Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed. Never shall I forget that smoke. Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky. Since the publication of this passage in Night, Elie Wiesel has devoted his life to ensuring that the world never forgets the horrors of the Holocaust, and to fostering the hope that they never happen again. Wiesel was 15 years old when the Nazis invaded his hometown of Sighet, Romania. He and his family were taken to Auschwitz, where his mother and the youngest of his three sisters died. He and his father were later transported to Buchenwald, where his father died shortly before Allied forces liberated the camp in 1945. After the war, Wiesel attended the Sorbonne in Paris and worked for a while as a journalist. He met the Nobel Prize-winning writer Francois Mauriac, who helped persuade Wiesel to break his private vow never to speak of his experiences in the death camps. During a long recuperation from a car accident in New York City in 1956, Wiesel decided to make his home in the United States. His memoir Night, which appeared two years later (compressed from an earlier, longer work, And the World Remained Silent), was initially met with skepticism. The Holocaust was not something people wanted to know about in those days, Wiesel later said in a Time magazine interview. But eventually the book drew recognition and readers. A slim volume of terrifying power (The New York Times), Night remains one of the most widely read works on the Holocaust. It was followed by over 40 more books, including novels, essay collections and plays. Wiesels writings often explore the paradoxes raised by his memories: he finds it impossible to speak about the Holocaust, yet impossible to remain silent; impossible to believe in God, yet impossible not to believe. Wiesel has also worked to bring attention to the plight of oppressed people around the world. When human lives are endangered, when human dignity is in jeopardy, national borders and sensitivities become irrelevant, he said in his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. Wherever men and women are persecuted because of their race, religion, or political views, that place must — at that moment — become the center of the universe. Though lauded by many as a crusader for justice, Wiesel has also been criticized for his part in what some see as the commercialization of the Holocaust. In his 2000 memoir And the Sea Is Never Full, Wiesel shares some of his own qualms about fame and politics, but reiterates what he sees as his duty as a survivor and witness: The one among us who would survive would testify for all of us. He would speak and demand justice on our behalf; as our spokesman he would make certain that our memory would penetrate that of humanity. He would do nothing else.

Good To Know

Use of the term Holocaust to describe the extermination of six million Jews and millions of other civilians by the Nazis is widely thought to have originated in Night. Two of Wiesels subsequent works , Dawn and The Accident, form a kind of trilogy with Night. These stories live deeply in all that I have written and all that I am ever going to write, the author has said. President Jimmy Carter appointed Wiesel to be chairman of the Presidents Commission on the Holocaust in 1978. In 1980, Wiesel became founding chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. He is also the founding president of the Paris-based Universal Academy of Cultures and cofounder of the Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity. Since 1969, Marion Wiesel has translated her husband Elies books from French into English. They live in New York City and have one son.

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