The Dangerous Alphabet by Neil Gaiman - PDF free download eBook

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  • Published: Sep 05, 2015
  • Reviews: 318

Brief introduction:

A is for Always, thats where we embark . . .Two children, treasure map in hand, and their pet gazelle sneak past their father, out of their house, and into a world beneath the city, where monsters and pirates roam.Will they find the treasure? Will...

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Details of The Dangerous Alphabet

ISBN
9780060783334
Publisher
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date
Age range
5 - 8 Years
Book language
EN
Pages
32
Format
PDF, DJVU, DOC, FB2
Quality
Extra high quality OCR
Dimensions
11.10 (w) x 7.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)
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Some brief overview of this book

A is for Always, thats where we embark . . .

Two children, treasure map in hand, and their pet gazelle sneak past their father, out of their house, and into a world beneath the city, where monsters and pirates roam.

Will they find the treasure? Will they make it out alive?

collecting raw materials and assembling them into his own wretched creations. These reanimated tales include Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Madness, Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Death and Dementia, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, and Pinocchio. He has also given life to original forms like Neil Gaiman’s The Dangerous Alphabet and his own Wicked Nursery Rhymes series, among other demented favorites.

Biography

Neil Gaiman thought he wrote comic books. But a newspaper editor, of course, set him straight. Back when he was riding the diabolical headwinds of his popular series of graphic novels, The Sandman, the author attended a party where he introduced himself as a comic-book writer to a newspapers literary editor. But when the editor quickly realized who this actually was — and the glaze melted from his eyes — he offered Gaiman a correction tinged with astonishment: My God, man, you dont write comics, you write graphic novels. Relating the story to theLos Angeles Times in 1995, Gaiman said, I suddenly felt like someone who had been informed that she wasnt a hooker, that in fact she was a lady of the evening. Gaimans done much more, of course, than simply write graphic novels, having coauthored, with Terry Pratchett, Good Omens, a comic novel about the Apocalypse; adapted into hardcover the BBC miniseries Neverwhere about the dark underworld beneath the streets of London; and, inspired by his young daughter, put a horrifying spin on C.S. Lewis wardrobe doors for Coraline, a childrens book about a passageway into a magical, yet malevolent, land. But it is The Sandman that is Gaimans magnum opus. Though he had told a career counselor in high school that he wanted to pen comic books, he had a career as a freelance journalist before his first graphic novel, Violent Cases, was published in England in 1987. DC Comics discovered him and The Sandman was born. Or reborn, actually. The comic debuted back in 1939 with a regular-Joe crime fighter in the lead. But in Gaimans hands the tale had a more otherworldly spin, slowing introducing readers to the seven siblings Endless: Dream, Death, Desire, Destiny, Destruction, Despair and Delirium (once Delight). They all have their roles in shaping the fates of man. In fact, when Death was imprisoned for decades, the results were devastating. Richard Nixon reached The White House and Michael Jackson the Billboard charts. Direction from newspaper editors notwithstanding, to Gaiman, these stories are still comic books. The man who shuttled back and forth between comics and classics in his formative years and can pepper his writing with references to Norse mythology as well as the vaudevillian rock group Queen, never cottoned to such highbrow/lowbrow distinctions. Comparing notes on a yachting excursion with members of the Irish rock band U2, the writer who looks like a rock star and Delirium and the rock stars who gave themselves comic-worthy names such as Bono and The Edge came to a realization: Whether the medium is pop music or comic books, not being taken seriously can be a plus. Its safer to be in the gutter, he told The Washington Post in 1995. In 1995, Gaiman brought The Sandman to a close and began spending more time on his nongraphic fiction, including a couple of short-story collections. A few years later he released Stardust, an adult fairy tale that has young Tristan Thorn searching for a fallen star to woo the lovely but cold Victoria Forester. In 2001, he placed an ex-con named Shadow in the middle of a war between the ancient and modern dieties in American Gods. Coming in October 2002 is another departure: an audio recording of Two Plays for Voices, which stars Bebe Neuwirth as a wise queen doing battle with a bloodthirsty child and Brian Dennehy as the Angel of Vengeance investigating the first crime in history in heavens City of Angels. Gaiman need not worry about defining his artistic relevance, since so many other seem to do it for him. Stephen King, Roger Zelazny and Harlan Ellison are among those who have contributed introductions to his works. William Gibson, the man who coined the term cyberspace, called him a a writer of rare perception and endless imagination as well as an American treasure. (Even though hes, technically, a British treasure transplanted to the American Midwest.) Even Norman Mailer has weighed in: Along with all else, Sandman is a comic strip for intellectuals, and I say its about time. The gushiest praise, however, may come from Frank McConnell, who barely contained himself in the pages of the political and artistic journal Commonweal. Saying Gaiman may just be the most gifted and important storyteller in English, McConnell crowned Sandman as the most important act of fiction of the day. And that, not just because of the brilliance and intricacy of its storytelling — and I know few stories, outside the best of Joyce, Faulkner, and Pynchon, that are more intricate, he wrote in October 1995, but also because it tells its wonderful and humanizing tale in a medium, comic books, still largely considered demimonde by the tenured zombies of the academic establishment. If Sandman is a comic, he concluded, then The Magic Flute is a musical and A Midsummer Nights Dream is a skit. Read the damn thing: its important.

Good To Know

Some fascinating factoids from our interview with Gaiman: One of the most enjoyable bits of writing Sandman was getting authors whose work I love to write the introductions for the collected graphic novels — people like Steve Erickson, Gene Wolfe, Harlan Ellison, Clive Barker, Peter Straub, Mikal Gilmore, and Samuel R. Delany. I have a big old Addams Family house, with — in the summertime — a vegetable garden, and I love growing exotic pumpkins. As a boy in England I used to dream about Ray Bradbury Halloweens, and am thrilled that I get them these days. Unless Im on the road signing peoples books, of course. According to my daughters, my most irritating habit is asking for cups of tea. I love radio — and love the availability of things like the Jack Benny radio shows in MP3 format. Im addicted to BBC radio 7, and keep buying boxed CD sets of old UK radio programs, things like Round the Horne and Hancocks Half Hour. Every now and again Ill write a radio play. I love thunderstorms, old houses, and dreams.

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A few words about book author

Neil Gaiman is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of more than twenty books for readers of all ages, and the recipient of numerous literary awards, including the Shirley Jackson Award and the Locus Award for Best Novelette for his story The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains. Originally from England, he now lives in America.

Gris Grimly was born much later, but he too experienced tragedy and dismay throughout his life. Considered a Mad Creator among colleagues, he is known for collecting raw materials and assembling them into his own wretched creations. These reanimated tales include Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Madness, Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Death and Dementia, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, and Pinocchio. He has also given life to original forms like Neil Gaiman’s The Dangerous Alphabet and his own Wicked Nursery Rhymes series, among other demented favorites.

Biography

Neil Gaiman thought he wrote comic books. But a newspaper editor, of course, set him straight. Back when he was riding the diabolical headwinds of his popular series of graphic novels, The Sandman, the author attended a party where he introduced himself as a comic-book writer to a newspapers literary editor. But when the editor quickly realized who this actually was — and the glaze melted from his eyes — he offered Gaiman a correction tinged with astonishment: My God, man, you dont write comics, you write graphic novels. Relating the story to theLos Angeles Times in 1995, Gaiman said, I suddenly felt like someone who had been informed that she wasnt a hooker, that in fact she was a lady of the evening. Gaimans done much more, of course, than simply write graphic novels, having coauthored, with Terry Pratchett, Good Omens, a comic novel about the Apocalypse; adapted into hardcover the BBC miniseries Neverwhere about the dark underworld beneath the streets of London; and, inspired by his young daughter, put a horrifying spin on C.S. Lewis wardrobe doors for Coraline, a childrens book about a passageway into a magical, yet malevolent, land. But it is The Sandman that is Gaimans magnum opus. Though he had told a career counselor in high school that he wanted to pen comic books, he had a career as a freelance journalist before his first graphic novel, Violent Cases, was published in England in 1987. DC Comics discovered him and The Sandman was born. Or reborn, actually. The comic debuted back in 1939 with a regular-Joe crime fighter in the lead. But in Gaimans hands the tale had a more otherworldly spin, slowing introducing readers to the seven siblings Endless: Dream, Death, Desire, Destiny, Destruction, Despair and Delirium (once Delight). They all have their roles in shaping the fates of man. In fact, when Death was imprisoned for decades, the results were devastating. Richard Nixon reached The White House and Michael Jackson the Billboard charts. Direction from newspaper editors notwithstanding, to Gaiman, these stories are still comic books. The man who shuttled back and forth between comics and classics in his formative years and can pepper his writing with references to Norse mythology as well as the vaudevillian rock group Queen, never cottoned to such highbrow/lowbrow distinctions. Comparing notes on a yachting excursion with members of the Irish rock band U2, the writer who looks like a rock star and Delirium and the rock stars who gave themselves comic-worthy names such as Bono and The Edge came to a realization: Whether the medium is pop music or comic books, not being taken seriously can be a plus. Its safer to be in the gutter, he told The Washington Post in 1995. In 1995, Gaiman brought The Sandman to a close and began spending more time on his nongraphic fiction, including a couple of short-story collections. A few years later he released Stardust, an adult fairy tale that has young Tristan Thorn searching for a fallen star to woo the lovely but cold Victoria Forester. In 2001, he placed an ex-con named Shadow in the middle of a war between the ancient and modern dieties in American Gods. Coming in October 2002 is another departure: an audio recording of Two Plays for Voices, which stars Bebe Neuwirth as a wise queen doing battle with a bloodthirsty child and Brian Dennehy as the Angel of Vengeance investigating the first crime in history in heavens City of Angels. Gaiman need not worry about defining his artistic relevance, since so many other seem to do it for him. Stephen King, Roger Zelazny and Harlan Ellison are among those who have contributed introductions to his works. William Gibson, the man who coined the term cyberspace, called him a a writer of rare perception and endless imagination as well as an American treasure. (Even though hes, technically, a British treasure transplanted to the American Midwest.) Even Norman Mailer has weighed in: Along with all else, Sandman is a comic strip for intellectuals, and I say its about time. The gushiest praise, however, may come from Frank McConnell, who barely contained himself in the pages of the political and artistic journal Commonweal. Saying Gaiman may just be the most gifted and important storyteller in English, McConnell crowned Sandman as the most important act of fiction of the day. And that, not just because of the brilliance and intricacy of its storytelling — and I know few stories, outside the best of Joyce, Faulkner, and Pynchon, that are more intricate, he wrote in October 1995, but also because it tells its wonderful and humanizing tale in a medium, comic books, still largely considered demimonde by the tenured zombies of the academic establishment. If Sandman is a comic, he concluded, then The Magic Flute is a musical and A Midsummer Nights Dream is a skit. Read the damn thing: its important.

Good To Know

Some fascinating factoids from our interview with Gaiman: One of the most enjoyable bits of writing Sandman was getting authors whose work I love to write the introductions for the collected graphic novels — people like Steve Erickson, Gene Wolfe, Harlan Ellison, Clive Barker, Peter Straub, Mikal Gilmore, and Samuel R. Delany. I have a big old Addams Family house, with — in the summertime — a vegetable garden, and I love growing exotic pumpkins. As a boy in England I used to dream about Ray Bradbury Halloweens, and am thrilled that I get them these days. Unless Im on the road signing peoples books, of course. According to my daughters, my most irritating habit is asking for cups of tea. I love radio — and love the availability of things like the Jack Benny radio shows in MP3 format. Im addicted to BBC radio 7, and keep buying boxed CD sets of old UK radio programs, things like Round the Horne and Hancocks Half Hour. Every now and again Ill write a radio play. I love thunderstorms, old houses, and dreams.

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EPUB

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PDF

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MOBI

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