A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith - PDF free download eBook

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  • Published: Nov 01, 2015
  • Reviews: 1131

Brief introduction:

The American classic about a young girls coming of age at the turn of the century.A profoundly moving novel, and an honest and true one. It cuts right to the heart of life...If you miss A Tree Grows in Brooklyn you will deny yourself a rich...

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Details of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

ISBN
9780899663036
Publisher
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date
Age range
18+ Years
Book language
ENG
Pages
321
Format
PDF, CHM, DJVU, DOC
Quality
Low quality scanned pages
Dimensions
6.20 (w) x 8.42 (h) x 1.24 (d)
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Some brief overview of this book

The American classic about a young girls coming of age at the turn of the century.

A profoundly moving novel, and an honest and true one. It cuts right to the heart of life...If you miss A Tree Grows in Brooklyn you will deny yourself a rich experience...It is a poignant and deeply understanding story of childhood and family relationships. The Nolans lived in the Williamsburg slums of Brooklyn from 1902 until 1919...Their daughter Francie and their son Neely knew more than their fair share of the privations and sufferings that are the lot of a great citys poor. Primarily this is Francies book. She is a superb feat of characterization, an imaginative, alert, resourceful child. And Francies growing up and beginnings of wisdom are the substance of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

— New York Times

One of the most dearly beloved and one of the finest books of our day.

—Orville Prescott

One of the books of the century.

—New York Public Library

Author Biography: Betty Smith was born Elisabeth Wehner on December 15, 1896, the same date as, although five years earlier than, her fictional heroine Francie Nolan. The daughter of German immigrants, she grew up poor in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, the very world she re-creates with such meticulous detail in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.After marrying fellow Brooklynite George H.E. Smith, she moved with him to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he was a law student at the University of Michigan. The young bride soon had two daughters, Nancy and Mary, and was forced to wait until the girls had entered grade school before endeavoring to complete her own formal education.Although she had not finished high school, the largely autodidactic Smith was permitted to take classes at the university, and she concentrated her studies there in journalism, drama, writing and literature. She capped her education by winning the Avery Hopkins Award for work in drama, and did a three-year course in playwriting at the Yale Drama School.After stints writing features for a Detroit newspaper, reading plays for the Federal Theatre Project, and acting in summer stock, Smith landed in Chapel Hill, North Carolina under the auspices of the W.P.A. She and her first husband divorced in 1938. In 1943, she married JoeJones, a writer, journalist, and associate editor of the Chapel Hill Weekly, while he was serving as a private in the wartime army. That same year, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, her first novel, was published.The prestige of writing a best-selling, critically lauded book brought assignments from the New York Times Magazine, for which she wrote both light-hearted and serious commentary. In a December 1943 piece called Why Brooklyn is that Way, Smith donned the mantle of her childhood boroughs unofficial champion. Her perceptions at once encapsulate one of the core themes of her novel and answer some of her more urbane critics. Brooklyn is the small town — but on a gigantic scale — that the New Yorker ran away from, she wrote. In jeering at Brooklyns mores and ideology, your New Yorker may be trying to exorcise his own small-town background.Although most remembered for the phenomenal success of that first book, Smith wrote other novels, including Tomorrow Will Be Better (1947), Maggie-Now (1958), and Joy in the Morning (1963). She also had a long career as a dramatist, writing one-act and full-length plays for which she received both the Rockefeller Fellowship and the Dramatists Guild Fellowship. She died in 1972.

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A few words about book author

Betty Smith (1896–1972) was a native of Brooklyn, New York. Her novels A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Tomorrow Will Be Better, Joy in the Morning, and Maggie-Now continue to capture the hearts and imaginations of millions of readers worldwide.

are of the privations and sufferings that are the lot of a great citys poor. Primarily this is Francies book. She is a superb feat of characterization, an imaginative, alert, resourceful child. And Francies growing up and beginnings of wisdom are the substance of A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.

— New York Times

One of the most dearly beloved and one of the finest books of our day.

—Orville Prescott

One of the books of the century.

—New York Public Library

Author Biography: Betty Smith was born Elisabeth Wehner on December 15, 1896, the same date as, although five years earlier than, her fictional heroine Francie Nolan. The daughter of German immigrants, she grew up poor in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, the very world she re-creates with such meticulous detail in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn.After marrying fellow Brooklynite George H.E. Smith, she moved with him to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he was a law student at the University of Michigan. The young bride soon had two daughters, Nancy and Mary, and was forced to wait until the girls had entered grade school before endeavoring to complete her own formal education.Although she had not finished high school, the largely autodidactic Smith was permitted to take classes at the university, and she concentrated her studies there in journalism, drama, writing and literature. She capped her education by winning the Avery Hopkins Award for work in drama, and did a three-year course in playwriting at the Yale Drama School.After stints writing features for a Detroit newspaper, reading plays for the Federal Theatre Project, and acting in summer stock, Smith landed in Chapel Hill, North Carolina under the auspices of the W.P.A. She and her first husband divorced in 1938. In 1943, she married JoeJones, a writer, journalist, and associate editor of the Chapel Hill Weekly, while he was serving as a private in the wartime army. That same year, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, her first novel, was published.The prestige of writing a best-selling, critically lauded book brought assignments from the New York Times Magazine, for which she wrote both light-hearted and serious commentary. In a December 1943 piece called Why Brooklyn is that Way, Smith donned the mantle of her childhood boroughs unofficial champion. Her perceptions at once encapsulate one of the core themes of her novel and answer some of her more urbane critics. Brooklyn is the small town — but on a gigantic scale — that the New Yorker ran away from, she wrote. In jeering at Brooklyns mores and ideology, your New Yorker may be trying to exorcise his own small-town background.Although most remembered for the phenomenal success of that first book, Smith wrote other novels, including Tomorrow Will Be Better (1947), Maggie-Now (1958), and Joy in the Morning (1963). She also had a long career as a dramatist, writing one-act and full-length plays for which she received both the Rockefeller Fellowship and the Dramatists Guild Fellowship. She died in 1972.

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